Wrinkles


Aging skin is inevitable but with the information and technologies we have one can really look as young as you feel. Wrinkles are caused by a combination of factors — some you can control, others you can’t.

1) Age
 
As you get older, your skin naturally becomes less elastic and more fragile. Decreased production of natural oils makes your skin drier and appears more wrinkled. Fat in the deeper layers of your skin, which gives the skin a plump appearance, starts to diminish. This causes loose, saggy skin and more-pronounced lines and crevices.

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2) Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light
 
Ultraviolet radiation markedly speeds up the natural aging process and is the primary cause of early wrinkling. Exposure to UV light breaks down your skin’s connective tissue — collagen and elastin fibers, which lie in the deeper layer of skin (dermis). Without the supportive connective tissue, your skin loses its strength and flexibility. As a result, skin begins to sag and wrinkle prematurely.

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3) Smoking
 
Smoking can accelerate the normal aging process of your skin, contributing to wrinkles. This may be due to changes in the blood supply to your skin.

smoking
 
4) Repeated facial expressions
 
Facial movements and expressions, such as squinting or smiling, lead to fine lines and wrinkles. Each time you use a facial muscle, a groove forms beneath the surface of the skin. And as skin ages, it loses its flexibility and is no longer able to spring back in place. These grooves then become permanent features on your face.

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5) Gender
 
Women tend to develop more wrinkles around their mouths (perioral) than men do. That may be because women have fewer sweat glands and glands that secrete an oily matter known as sebum (sebaceous glands) to lubricate the skin and fewer blood vessels in this area.

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6) Poor nutrition
 
Nutritional deficiencies are believed to contribute to skin aging.

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What You Can Do

  • Avoid the sun. It’s the No. 1 cause of wrinkles, with dozens of studies documenting the impact.
  • Wear sunscreen. If you must go out in the sun, wear sunscreen! It will protect you from skin cancer and help prevent wrinkles at the same time.
  • Don’t smoke. More and more studies are confirming that cigarette smoke ages skin — mostly by releasing an enzyme that breaks down collagen and elastin, important components of the skin.
  • Get adequate sleep. When you don’t get enough sleep, the body produces excess cortisol, a hormone that breaks down skin cells.
  • Get enough rest, and you’ll produce more HGH which helps skin remain thick, more “elastic,” and less likely to wrinkle.
  • Don’t squint — get reading glasses! The AAD says any repetitive facial movement — like squinting — overworks facial muscles, forming a groove beneath the skin’s surface. This groove eventually becomes a wrinkle. Also important: Wear sunglasses. It will protect skin around the eyes from sun damage — and further keep you from squinting.
  • Eat more fish — particularly salmon. Not only is salmon (along with other cold-water fish) a great source of protein — one of the building blocks of great skin — it’s also an awesome source of an essential fatty acid known as omega-3.  Essential fatty acids help nourish skin and keep it plump and youthful, helping to reduce wrinkles.
  • Eat more fruits & vegetables. The key  are their antioxidant compounds. These compounds fight damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules that can damage cells), which in turn helps skin look younger and more radiant, and protects against some effects of photo aging.
  • Use moisturizer. “Women, especially, are so concerned with antiaging products they often overlook the power of a simple moisturizer. Skin that is moist simply looks better, so lines and creases are far less noticeable.”
  • Alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs). These natural fruit acids lift away the top layer of dead skin cells, reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, particularly around the eyes. New evidence shows that in higher concentrations, AHAs may help stimulate collagen production.
  • Retinoids (including Retin A). The only FDA-approved topical treatment for wrinkles is tretinoin, known commercially as Retin A.  This prescription cream reduces fine lines and large wrinkles, and repairs sun damage.
  • Topical vitamin C.  It can increase collagen production, protect against damage from UVA and UVB rays, correct pigmentation problems, and improve inflammatory skin conditions.
  • Growth factors. Part of the body’s natural wound-healing response, these compounds, when applied topically, may reduce sun damage and decrease lines and wrinkles, while rejuvenating collagen production.
  • Botox. An injection of this purified version of the Botulinum toxin A relaxes the muscle just underneath the wrinkle, allowing the skin on top to lie smooth and crease-free.
  • Wrinkle fillers. These fill wrinkles with a variety of substances, including collagen, hyaluronic acid, and other synthetic compounds. Popular treatments include Restylane, Juvederm, and Radiesse, among others.
  • Laser/light resurfacing. Here, energy from a light source — either a laser or a pulsed diode light — removes the top layer of skin, causing a slight but unnoticeable skin “wounding.” This kicks the skin’s natural collagen-production system into high gear, resulting in smoother, more wrinkle-free skin.
  • Chemical peels. In this treatment, one of a variety of different chemicals is used to “burn” away the top layer of skin, creating damage that causes the body to respond by making more collagen. You end up with younger-looking, smoother skin.
  • Dermabrasion. A vacuum suction used in tandem with a crystal free device, dermabrasion helps remove the top layer of skin cells and bring new, more evenly textured skin to the surface. In the process, fine lines and wrinkles seem to disappear.

Please make an appointment for a detailed consultation to show you all the options you have.